The Cougar

Wherein Tinso becomes the grateful beneficiary of some random acts of generosity, makes a slight return to selected highlights of his wayward youth and coincidentally acquires en route a subtle and sophisticated appreciation of some of the finer things in life.

I’ve fallen for an older one.

I suppose ‘Cougar’ is a little unfair – she’s actually a couple of years younger than me, but she’s so much more ‘mature’ than I’m used to. Same basic outline - some lumps, bumps, and battle scars, and her midsection’s thicker than most - but her shape is still there and just as captivating.

The ride is awesome. I’m loving every minute of being back in the saddle. She’s built for comfort, not for speed: settle in and enjoy the ride, without working her too hard. In fact, she does all the work for me, and it doesn’t have to be big to satisfy both of us either, just good clean fun.

I used to look sideways at hipsters with their 30+yo single fins, thinking “why would you ride a junker, when all the performance you could ever ask for is at your fingertips?”  First wave, I found out. A donated (thanks Albert) Friar Tuck single fin, rounded step-tail slab with a nice wide, thick girth, and an equally aged and donated box fin (cheers Nick) have opened my eyes and the gate and the horse has bolted. With beyond yellowed foam, even darker ding repairs and patches of car-bog, this who-knows-how-old Friar Tuck is a whole lotta fun! The focus goes straight back onto riding a wave purely for THAT feeling. Slide in, bottom turn, and go! You won’t be launching off the lip, or smashing aerial 360’s, but you just might enjoy feeling a little 70’s-ish, cruising up and down a cool green wall.

The grommet stoke is still all there, in that feeling of elation when you’ve just wired taking off, bottom turning, and lining up a peeling wall: all smooth and flowing without any learner clumsiness. When you finally pull out off the back and realise you’ve just nailed that one … well, we all remember it!

It might be just that a change is as good as a holiday, but it feels like it’s another arrow in the quiver, another option for a different set of conditions. Riding as many different boards as possible is a great thing for your surfing, and a great thing for the soul. Widens your horizons, opens your eyes and minds. All that hippie guff.

Have a hunt for your own cougar. She’s out there somewhere. You never know where she’s hiding or how old she might be, but treat her right and she just might show you a trick or two along the way.

Craig Tinsley

RH legless.tv

Illawarra love

Waikiki beach boys and California girls, tanned skin, bikinis, fringing reefs and swaying palms: like it or not, these are the elements that have formed the archetypal images of twentieth century surfing. In reality, every place around the world where people ride waves has always had its own local variation. The Gong, a town built on coal and steel, has a version that invariably involves neoprene and often places improbably perfect waves in brutally industrial settings. The most human – and perhaps the most beautiful - truth in this juxtaposition of natural and industrial is the reminder that what we see may not always be what it at first seems, and that those prepared to dig beneath the surface will often reap a rich reward. Of this session, Chayne said, “All I can remember about it is that it was pumping for a week and I could only catch 3 waves cause my ribs were busted. ” Albert’s take? “All I can remember is it was incredibly crowded and all I could get were three waves while weaving in and out of half of Cronulla that came down for the swell.” After all, everybody loves the Illawarra.

Thanks to South Coast Enigma Rob Slater for these pic’s of Chayne mixing things up at home.

Simon Farrer & Kei Fujioka looking very happy after the pair surfed Express Point by themselves.
Pic: Steen-16images

Simon Farrer & Kei Fujioka looking very happy after the pair surfed Express Point by themselves.

Pic: Steen-16images

One from the vaults

June and July bring southerlies and swell to the Illawarra coast and points south. Every south coast surfer has a list of favoured secret reefs, beaches or rock shelves filed away for those few special days when wind, tide and swell align. Revisiting those spots time after time ensures that with each mission, those who know increase both their wave quota and their local knowledge. Video rarely surfaces from any of these places, and what does is usually devoid of identifying features: participation is tolerated, publicity is not. Incursions by travellers and blow-ins from the big smoke are usually regulated by the power, intensity and degree of difficulty of the breaks themselves. Serious challenges await just around every corner: anyone who can get there, get out and get shacked, gets respect. Bring balls, humility and patience if you’re heading south. Attitude is best left at home. You won’t need it here.

Video courtesy of Simon Farrer.

US kneeriding
Sam Coyne

US kneeriding

Sam Coyne

Leftovers
Every surf-trip comes to an end, and when it does, the only things left are the memories. For every single one of us, the present is an ever-changing frame in which we experience life. Everything we do, whatever happens to us, we live through it all as a series of instants receding forever into the past, where they remain locked in memory. Experience and memory are the most powerful tools we have for learning, but much of that learning is subconscious. Without even being aware of it we’re constantly sifting memories, sorting and replacing, discarding the average, retaining only those representing significant deviations from the flat line of normality. What’s left is what moves us, teaches us and moulds us into who we are. A guy I worked with years ago once said that the highlights of his surfing life were all in Indonesia: good friends pushing each other in good warm water waves. I reckon he was onto something. Ultimately, we’re all just products of our leftovers. Better get out there and make sure you’ve got some good ones, eh?

RH

Hide & Seek
Chayne

troysimpsonphoto.com

Hide & Seek
Chayne

troysimpsonphoto.com

Legendary lensman, slab pioneer, amazing surfer.
Peter Crawford
Duranbah 1976
Photo: Richard ” Nat” Palmer

Legendary lensman, slab pioneer, amazing surfer.

Peter Crawford

Duranbah 1976

Photo: Richard ” Nat” Palmer

PHILLIP ISLAND KNEEBOARD PRO: 1985‐2014


30 years ago, 16 surfers gathered together to ride their kneeboards in the first ever Phillip Island Kneeboard Pro Event.  With good intentions and good vibes, these good mates gathered to celebrate kneeboard riding.  Little did they know that 30 years later most of them, along with a host of others, would still be doing the same thing at this exciting event held in a beautiful part of Australia. 

From humble beginnings, the PI Kneeboard Pro has become the longest running event of its kind in the world, outlasting all others.  It is for the surfers to come to, it is their event. “The One”.


Belief that it would last, enthusiasm, determination and organisation produced this outcome.  Its longevity is because someone cared that it lasted.  Custodians play an important role.  Ian Pewtress, Neil Luke and Jim Brown have had that privilege.  30 years of sticking to the same recipe for success is a great tribute to all who have been a part of it.  Each year improvements have been made for the surfer entering.  An excellent judging system ensures that every surfer will be judged equally.  It has produced the highest standard of kneeboard surfing the world has seen, as testified by the list of winners of this event.  All state, national and world champions.  Not everyone can win, but everyone can be a part of it.  Belief in belonging to this alternative surf style has kept the atmosphere upbeat, buoyant and positive.  And the Island has always provided waves.  Enjoy the moment, the Island, and keep experiencing the joy that kneeboarding brings.  The PI Kneeboard Pro provides you this opportunity.  Long may it do so.

 Neil Luke.


The Phillip Island Kneeboard Pro is on the 15th and 16th of March, 2014. For entries and further details  follow this link.

PHILLIP ISLAND KNEEBOARD PRO: 19852014

30 years ago, 16 surfers gathered together to ride their kneeboards in the first ever Phillip Island Kneeboard Pro Event.  With good intentions and good vibes, these good mates gathered to celebrate kneeboard riding.  Little did they know that 30 years later most of them, along with a host of others, would still be doing the same thing at this exciting event held in a beautiful part of Australia.

From humble beginnings, the PI Kneeboard Pro has become the longest running event of its kind in the world, outlasting all others.  It is for the surfers to come to, it is their event. “The One”.

Belief that it would last, enthusiasm, determination and organisation produced this outcome.  Its longevity is because someone cared that it lasted.  Custodians play an important role.  Ian Pewtress, Neil Luke and Jim Brown have had that privilege.  30 years of sticking to the same recipe for success is a great tribute to all who have been a part of it.  Each year improvements have been made for the surfer entering.  An excellent judging system ensures that every surfer will be judged equally.  It has produced the highest standard of kneeboard surfing the world has seen, as testified by the list of winners of this event.  All state, national and world champions.  Not everyone can win, but everyone can be a part of it.  Belief in belonging to this alternative surf style has kept the atmosphere upbeat, buoyant and positive.  And the Island has always provided waves.  Enjoy the moment, the Island, and keep experiencing the joy that kneeboarding brings.  The PI Kneeboard Pro provides you this opportunity.  Long may it do so.

 Neil Luke.

The Phillip Island Kneeboard Pro is on the 15th and 16th of March, 2014. For entries and further details  follow this link.

Core values

So today my almost 5 year old son and I had a day out. We went down to North Kirra for the big rally and paddle out in opposition to plans for the construction of a cruise ship terminal at North Kirra / Bilinga. Unless you’ve been living under a stone you’ll know the general gist of what this is all about: a scheme cooked up by unscrupulous developers to perpetrate a massive grab of public land and construct a monstrous blot on our coastline at enormous cost, including the loss of around a kilometre of open beach and one of the world’s top ten waves. The real prize in the developers’ sights is one of a number of casino licences soon to be granted by the Queensland state government.

Despite it being the kind of Queensland summer’s day that can leave you feeling about as lively as a bucket of hot tar, there was a grass-roots buzz in the air that kept the mood happy. Local people - and I mean real long-termers like the redoubtable Kevin Barr, Wayne Dean and Darren Handley - were out in force to protect their own while Kirra did her thing in the background. Ordinay people of all types, ages, shapes and sizes breezed in to hear Andrew McKinnon, Bruce Lee, Mick Fanning and others who stood before the crowd to say their respective pieces. It was a blast to see so many different people from several generations coming together to support Kirra. A raggedy east swell pushed in as the tide dropped away. What with the sweep and other currents, the paddle out was canned in favour of a mass gathering on the beach. People stood on the hot sand to form the letters WSR (for World Surfing Reserve). Photos were taken, smiles exchanged and everyone left feeling they’d done something worthwhile

After the main business was over, my boy and I adjourned to the nearest establishment we could find that offered both ice-cream and some shade to sit in while we ate it. After that we climbed back in the van and pootled up the road to Currumbin. We parked backed up onto the creek, climbed out, slipped under the wire fence and over the rocks with the boy’s Coolite and were in the water in thirty seconds flat. The boy sat on his board like Buddha and rode the little foamy waves inside the point all the way to the sand. We had a bit of a swim and picked up a few shells. Later we went back to the van to sit on the back bumper eating cheese and crackers washed down with water. We had another swim and headed home. 

Days like this are right at the core of coastal life in Australia. We have always allowed ordinary people free access to whatever lies below the high water mark. This is not a nation noted for making its foreshores private property. Almost every Australian has at some point in life enjoyed free and unimpeded access to a shoreline somewhere, whether to fish, sail or row a boat, swim, play cricket or football, surf, dive, walk, run, fly a kite, build sandcastles, pick up shells or simply sit in peace and watch the sun rise or set. The effort to save Kirra is a very small part of a war that’s being waged all over our coastline against people who would deny us and our children and their children yet to come the simplest and most basic of enjoyments: the opportunity to be immersed in something wild and unspoilt, even in the midst of ever-expanding suburbia. What’s at stake isn’t just the beach itself, but rather what it gives those of us who use it, become familiar with it, who are shaped and changed by it. What’s at stake depends on whom you ask. It may be sustenance, reflection, challenge or solace, but in the end what’s really at stake is our relationship with the world we live in and ourselves.

The best relationships grow over many years, involve giving and receiving and are most richly rewarding in a spiritual sense. That a person can look at a wave and see something of beauty worth preserving says something beautiful about that person. We are creating today the legacy we’ll leave our children and successive generations. A cruise ship terminal at Kirra?  At The Spit? I think not. Far far better that we say to them “this is something we found so perfect that all we felt compelled to do was preserve it.” 

Rob Harwood

Legless.tv

A Drop in the Ocean

We’ve said before that at Legless.tv we do things in our own time, and that’s our excuse for not posting a Christmas message last month. The back end of our year usually starts off busy, goes from hectic to frantic and finally dissolves in a blur of unreasonable work demands, unmakeable deadlines and last-minute Christmas shopping. Such is the madness of 21st century urban life on Earth. To absolve ourselves somewhat of the sin of dereliction we thought we’d fling together a New Year’s message: a bit of a thank you to all of you, wherever and whoever you may be, whatever you may be doing in this 14th year of the third millennium. As you can see, it took us a while to get around to posting it, but we thought it was worth it anyway, so here goes.

Yesterday, Legless.tv celebrated its third birthday. Legless came into being as a child of love: it exists solely because we love to ride waves on our knees. Everything we’ve achieved since we started this thing is an expression of that love. We can’t pretend that kneeboard surfing is cool, at least not to anyone other than us and perhaps you and the other weirdoes who follow us, but that’s never been of any real concern here. We have no potential sponsors beating down our office doors - we don’t even have an office, for that matter. We don’t get groupies or hangers-on. We’ve yet to meet any young children who dream of being us when they grow up. We do get the occasional glimmer of interest and approval from other fringe or alt.surf media, and that’s nice when it happens, but it’s not something we need or even expect. Besides, it always reminds us that as kneeboarders we’re perpetually just out of the mainstream loop. So … but there are consolations. Other kneeboarders send us unexpected interesting emails from odd places, we talk to real individuals pushing against the bounds of convention, we get to document real things and whatever we’re doing, we can take our time and get it right.

Those few consolations might not sound like much, listed as baldly as that, but to us here in 21st century urban Australia, same as anywhere, they’re hugely important. In this world of disposable passions and lifestyles, Legless.tv represents something real and true. What we do is a tiny drop in the enormous ocean of online activity, but to us it’s an important drop because it’s aimed at showing the world the very best of what we love: real, progressive, expressive kneeboard surfing. The progression of surfing from one generation to the next has always been fuelled by the enthusiasm of people like our contributors and creators, enthusiasm that grows organically from the feedback trickling in when we post things you like. What we post here only makes it online because we love this crazy thing we do. We hope that love shines through in everything we share with you. Spreading a little love around can only make this world a better place, and we reckon that’s something really worthwhile.

Anyway, your support means a lot to us.
All the best for the New Year.
Mahalo from Legless crew.

One of the biggest legends to grace the sport of kneeriding and a world renowned shaper of high performance kneeboards and surfboards, from the North Shore of Hawaii.
Buddy McCray

One of the biggest legends to grace the sport of kneeriding and a world renowned shaper of high performance kneeboards and surfboards, from the North Shore of Hawaii.

Buddy McCray

Home Sweet Home.

When we heard that Spain’s North Atlantic coast’s been getting some solid swell lately we thought of Spanish Legless barrel-fiend Chus Fiochi.  Knowing how hard he charges, and also knowing that he has a little GoPro habit, we thought we might hit him up for a little video. By coincidence, Chus was raving about a couple of good-as-it-gets sessions he’d just had: 10’-12’ barrels at a favourite point break. This is a guy who takes his fun pretty seriously, and that involves taking his boards to the edge of their performance parameters. Read on…

OK Chus, we heard one of your favourite spots has been pumping lately. Can you tell us a little bit about it, without giving away any secrets, of course … ?

It’s not a secret spot at all, as a matter of fact I think it’s the most famous spot in this area. It’s a right hand pointbreak with a rocky bottom that breaks in front of Santamarina Island, about 1km from the coast. It doesn’t break very often because it needs a solid swell and high-pressure winds, and that combo doesn’t happen very often. It’s usually a very crowded spot on smaller days but luckily not so much when it’s big.

 

What makes this wave so special for you? 

It has a very small takeoff area with lots of boulders and thus can be very tricky to drop into. Sometimes you can get a barrel right off the bat, but a typical wave there would be to do a turn and then wait for the bowl section at the end and see if you can get a barrel there. It’s a two hit pointbreak. It usually has morning sickness and the take-offs can be a nightmare and show who is committed and who isn’t, but when the NE winds pick up, the face cleans up and barrels start to happen in the bowl section. It’s difficult to figure how much speed you need to lose to get in and come out.

 

What are you riding at the moment?

Contrary to what most people like, I hate to buy new boards, and I only do so when they’re thrashed. I love to learn how they work in depth, so as you can imagine, I am still riding JC’s boards.

Didn’t you recently get an EPS / Epoxy 6’5” gun? How do you find that compared to the JCs?

I’m a funny guy with boards. I can’t ride most kneeboards as they are way too loose. I’m used to putting a lot of force into my bottom turns. If the board isn’t hard I just lose the tail and fall or spin sideways and lose all my speed. That’s a small problem I have with the Native. Even though Al made it harder than usual its not as hard as I would like it. Don’t get me wrong, I love that board! It’s super-fast and manoeuvrable but when I’m dropping in late and the wave has a lot of wall and there are a few bumps, I struggle to bottom turn. Because it’s a board for waves of consequence, when I fall she makes me pay, but she’s so much fun to ride on the upper part of the wave. On the A+ day in the afternoon I rode my JC board for big waves, which is completely the opposite: she gives me a ton of confidence on bottom turns but then loses a lot of speed when I do a standard mid-face carve. I should have ridden the Native that afternoon, but I had a horrible wipe-out in the morning and wasn’t in the mood! If the island wasn’t so far away and I wasn’t so tired I would have changed boards mid-session. My perfect big wave board would be one that paddles like the Native, bottom turns like the JC and then does all the rest like the Native.

 

I reckon the gem in my quiver is the JC board for barrels, I know her so well and she always delivers: cranking bottom turns, decelerate then accelerate in the barrel, I have it wired and since I only ride it when the waves are hollow and fast I love it! She doesn’t get wet very often but when she does it’s a really good sign.

 

You’re off travelling again at the end of this month, aren’t you?

I’m going to a small island in the Canaries. The first time I went there was in 1995. I love it! You have to walk everywhere, there are good waves and not so many people. You can often catch waves with just your mates when its big. For me, going there is like a 2 week long session of yoga: I always come back feeling great! My short clip (on Youtube) “Holidays In Then Sun” was filmed entirely there. They call the Canary Islands the Fortunate Islands for a reason you know!

 

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